Jun 2, 2011
Black Women Coaching Hires Increase; Men Decrease

One of the quieter battles currently taking place with college institutions is the hiring process — not just the hiring — of black coaches. It’s not nearly as much of an issue as it was 20 years ago, but as a whole, everyone’s still battling for a legitimacy — not just a perception — of equality and an uptick in black coaches in men’s and women’s basketball.

The Black Coaches and Administrators met in St. Petersburg, Fla., last week to recap their year, to celebrate all that went well and point out the data that’s encouraging, plus bring to light what still needs to be worked on. A number of things were discussed, including NCAA president Mark Emmert’s address to the group.

The best news: the number of black head coaches in women’s basketball rose.

Of the 18 Division I openings in the past year, five were filled by black women.

“By any standard of measurement, I’d say this year was a successful year, said Richard E. Lapchick, director of UCF’s Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport, who oversees the hiring report card programs for the Black Coaches and Administrators (BCA).

Eleven out of the 18 schools that were evaluated got A’s for their efforts, 14 of 16 in 2008-09, and 11 of 19 in 2007-08 all got A’s. Obviously that means that you can get an A even if you don’t hire a person (of color). The process we’re emphasizing is getting the best people in the room (for interviews), and that includes people of color, and by doing that, we’re going to see the numbers change.”

Men’s hoops, however, did not mirror the women’s trajectory. At its peak in recent years, men’s Division I basketball saw 25 percent of its head-coaching workforce as African-American. That number has fallen to 21 percent. Lapchick calls the dip “significant.” Getting the figure closer to the 30-percent margin is going to be the BCA’s goal in the next few years. I think it could happen with relative ease, given the amount of talent in the assistant pool that’s young and on the road to head gigs in the coming years.

There is also talk about having a “Rooney Rule” in college athletics. The Rooney Rule is used in the NFL and mandates every team give at least one African-American coach an interview when going through its hiring process (this also applies to positions of power, such as general manager). It’s somewhat controversial, as some believe it to be a token gesture (read: affirmative action) in a process that can have transparency — in regard to truly desired potential head coaches — that leads people to believe a certain candidate already has the job before he has the job.

But it has worked; the Pittsburgh Steelers, by most accounts, had no real intentions of hiring Mike Tomlin prior to his interview. He got the job and eventually led his team to a Super Bowl win.

Still, college presidents and ADs aren’t necessarily in the same struggle as the NFL is/once was. Each have exclusive lists of potential candidates, and those lists are usually colorblind. Perhaps a Rooney Rule-type wouldn’t hurt, however, when you see Frank Haith (above), Sydney Johnson, Ed Cooley, Paul Hewitt, Mike Anderson, Ron Hunter, Cuonzo Martin and others getting jobs this offseason, it’s good to know plenty of men of color are not only getting opportunities, but moving up in rank and tax bracket.

Even if there wasn’t an increase for black coaches across the board, many were promoted from one post to another, increasing their influence at the higher levels of the sport.

Black Women Coaching Hires Increase; Men Decrease

CBSSportsline.com, Matt Norlander

http://www.cbssports.com/mcc/blogs/entry/26283066/29742922

One of the quieter battles currently taking place with college institutions is the hiring process — not just the hiring — of black coaches. It’s not nearly as much of an issue as it was 20 years ago, but as a whole, everyone’s still battling for a legitimacy — not just a perception — of equality and an uptick in black coaches in men’s and women’s basketball. The Black Coaches and Administrators met in St. Petersburg, Fla., last week to recap their year, to celebrate all that went well and point out the data that’s encouraging, plus bring to light what still needs to be worked on. A number of things were discussed, including NCAA president Mark Emmert’s address to the group. The best news: the number of black head coaches in women’s basketball rose.

Of the 18 Division I openings in the past year, five were filled by black women.

“By any standard of measurement, I’d say this year was a successful year, said Richard E. Lapchick, director of UCF’s Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport, who oversees the hiring report card programs for the Black Coaches and Administrators (BCA).

Eleven out of the 18 schools that were evaluated got A’s for their efforts, 14 of 16 in 2008-09, and 11 of 19 in 2007-08 all got A’s. Obviously that means that you can get an A even if you don’t hire a person (of color). The process we’re emphasizing is getting the best people in the room (for interviews), and that includes people of color, and by doing that, we’re going to see the numbers change.”

Men’s hoops, however, did not mirror the women’s trajectory. At its peak in recent years, men’s Division I basketball saw 25 percent of its head-coaching workforce as African-American. That number has fallen to 21 percent. Lapchick calls the dip “significant.” Getting the figure closer to the 30-percent margin is going to be the BCA’s goal in the next few years. I think it could happen with relative ease, given the amount of talent in the assistant pool that’s young and on the road to head gigs in the coming years. There is also talk about having a “Rooney Rule” in college athletics. The Rooney Rule is used in the NFL and mandates every team give at least one African-American coach an interview when going through its hiring process (this also applies to positions of power, such as general manager). It’s somewhat controversial, as some believe it to be a token gesture (read: affirmative action) in a process that can have transparency — in regard to truly desired potential head coaches — that leads people to believe a certain candidate already has the job before he has the job. But it has worked; the Pittsburgh Steelers, by most accounts, had no real intentions of hiring Mike Tomlin prior to his interview. He got the job and eventually led his team to a Super Bowl win. Still, college presidents and ADs aren’t necessarily in the same struggle as the NFL is/once was. Each have exclusive lists of potential candidates, and those lists are usually colorblind. Perhaps a Rooney Rule-type wouldn’t hurt, however, when you see Frank Haith (above), Sydney Johnson, Ed Cooley, Paul Hewitt, Mike Anderson, Ron Hunter, Cuonzo Martin and others getting jobs this offseason, it’s good to know plenty of men of color are not only getting opportunities, but moving up in rank and tax bracket. Even if there wasn’t an increase for black coaches across the board, many were promoted from one post to another, increasing their influence at the higher levels of the sport.






75 Applewood Dr. Ste. A
P.O. Box 128
Sparta, MI 49345
616.520.2137
Interested in the print edition of Coach & Athletic Director?

Subscribe Today »

website development by deyo designs