Jan 17, 2011
Coach Describes Moments After Shooting Following Team’s Victory

He is Joe Arbitello, the young guy who coaches basketball at Christ the King, and his team had just beaten Bishop Loughlin Memorial in Fort Greene, Brooklyn, on Friday night. It was 69-57 for Christ the King, and now Arbitello was crossing Clermont, walking to where he had to park the team bus, when he heard the gunshots.

“Bang bang bang, like that, Arbitello says. Listen, I’m a city kid. Queens Village. It’s not the first time I’ve heard gunfire in my life. I started running.”

He knew his players were still inside Loughlin, told to wait for him there until he came back for them. Now at 10 o’clock on a Friday night in Brooklyn, not knowing where the shooter was, just knowing he was closer to the bus than to the gym at Loughlin, Arbitello’s only thought was to get off the street and get down. It was happening to him because it can happen anywhere.

He didn’t know if he’d be any safer inside the bus. But Arbitello, a few minutes after a big win for his team, 33 years old, a former Christ the King player now coaching his old school, was just looking for cover now.

“I am going to be honest with you, he says. I’m in Brooklyn on a Friday night and as soon as I hear the gun, I’m thinking about Tucson.”

Arbitello says, It doesn’t matter where you are if there’s a gun in the area.

He is a New York City high school basketball coach, on the other side of the country from Tucson. But it was only six days after six were dead because of a shooting there, outside a Safeway on a Saturday morning. One of the dead was a 9-year-old girl named Christina Taylor Green. She was the granddaughter of Dallas Green, a great old baseball man.

And she was the daughter of John Dallas Green and Roxanna Green. The gunman never cares if it is someone’s child. Neither does the gun. At least nobody died on the street outside Bishop Loughlin Memorial. But four were shot.

The guy with the gun, still being sought yesterday, was some fat guy in an orange jumpsuit. He apparently wanted the expensive knit caps being worn by a 19-year old named Justin Dolcy and a friend with whom Dolcy had attended the Christ the King vs. Loughlin basketball game.

One of the bullets lodged in the foot of a teenage girl named Tyesha Lespinasse, who said this to the Daily News:

“How do you tell a mother their son’s gone, over a hat?”

So far no one has found the gun. It is known that 9-mm. shell casings were found on a playground at Vanderbilt and Greene. Where did the gun come from? Where they always come from: somewhere.

In the case of the shooter in Tucson, the gun came from a Sportsman’s Warehouse outlet. Despite being rejected by the Army, reportedly for a failed drug test, despite being kicked out of Pima Community College for increasingly weird and unstable behavior and urged by the college to get help, Jared Lee Loughner filled out the proper paperwork and passed a Sportsman’s Warehouse background check with flying colors and was allowed to purchase a Glock 19 for around $450. Not including ammunition and magazines.

When Seung-Hui Cho killed 32 innocent people at Virginia Tech a few years ago, one of his weapons of choice was a Glock 19, along with a Walther P22 rifle. You know why Cho was able to get guns? Because he wanted them. He killed 32. Loughner killed six and tried to kill Rep. Gabrielle Giffords and injured others.

The country mourns a spectacular 9-year-old girl. People pray for a 40-year-old congresswoman largely unknown outside Arizona until Loughner started shooting, pray for her the way they would a family member. And pray for the others who were injured and the heroes who prevented a greater loss of life, all these Americans joined together by the moment when the shooting started in Tucson.

And four were injured after a high school basketball game in Brooklyn on Friday night, but at least nobody died up the street from Bishop Loughlin.

“We saw a girl laid out, Corey Edwards, a Christ the King guard, said.

Then Edwards said, Coach could have been walking toward where they were shooting.

Joe Arbitello didn’t know exactly where the shooting was, just knew that this time it was close to him, to a big win for his basketball team.

“How could you not think about Tucson?” Arbitello said. “I was wondering if this time some nut had opened fire near the team bus.”

Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/ny_local/2011/01/17/2011-01-17_the_bang_bang_bangs_getting_closer_bklyn_gunfire__and_coach_wonders_if_tucson_ca.html#ixzz1BJ9kbIvT

Coach Describes Moments After Shooting Following Team’s Victory

New York Daily News (Mike Lupica)

He is Joe Arbitello, the young guy who coaches basketball at Christ the King, and his team had just beaten Bishop Loughlin Memorial in Fort Greene, Brooklyn, on Friday night. It was 69-57 for Christ the King, and now Arbitello was crossing Clermont, walking to where he had to park the team bus, when he heard the gunshots.

“Bang bang bang, like that, Arbitello says. Listen, I’m a city kid. Queens Village . It’s not the first time I’ve heard gunfire in my life. I started running.”

He knew his players were still inside Loughlin, told to wait for him there until he came back for them. Now at 10 o’clock on a Friday night in Brooklyn, not knowing where the shooter was, just knowing he was closer to the bus than to the gym at Loughlin, Arbitello’s only thought was to get off the street and get down. It was happening to him because it can happen anywhere.

He didn’t know if he’d be any safer inside the bus. But Arbitello, a few minutes after a big win for his team, 33 years old, a former Christ the King player now coaching his old school, was just looking for cover now.

“I am going to be honest with you, he says. I’m in Brooklyn on a Friday night and as soon as I hear the gun, I’m thinking about Tucson .”

Arbitello says, It doesn’t matter where you are if there’s a gun in the area.

He is a New York City high school basketball coach, on the other side of the country from Tucson. But it was only six days after six were dead because of a shooting there, outside a Safeway on a Saturday morning. One of the dead was a 9-year-old girl named Christina Taylor Green . She was the granddaughter of Dallas Green, a great old baseball man.

And she was the daughter of John Dallas Green and Roxanna Green . The gunman never cares if it is someone’s child. Neither does the gun. At least nobody died on the street outside Bishop Loughlin Memorial. But four were shot.

The guy with the gun, still being sought yesterday, was some fat guy in an orange jumpsuit. He apparently wanted the expensive knit caps being worn by a 19-year old named Justin Dolcy and a friend with whom Dolcy had attended the Christ the King vs. Loughlin basketball game.

One of the bullets lodged in the foot of a teenage girl named Tyesha Lespinasse, who said this to the Daily News:

“How do you tell a mother their son’s gone, over a hat?”

So far no one has found the gun. It is known that 9-mm. shell casings were found on a playground at Vanderbilt and Greene. Where did the gun come from? Where they always come from: somewhere.

In the case of the shooter in Tucson, the gun came from a Sportsman’s Warehouse outlet. Despite being rejected by the Army, reportedly for a failed drug test, despite being kicked out of Pima Community College for increasingly weird and unstable behavior and urged by the college to get help, Jared Lee Loughner filled out the proper paperwork and passed a Sportsman’s Warehouse background check with flying colors and was allowed to purchase a Glock 19 for around $450. Not including ammunition and magazines.

When Seung-Hui Cho killed 32 innocent people at Virginia Tech a few years ago, one of his weapons of choice was a Glock 19, along with a Walther P22 rifle. You know why Cho was able to get guns? Because he wanted them. He killed 32. Loughner killed six and tried to kill Rep. Gabrielle Giffords and injured others.

The country mourns a spectacular 9-year-old girl. People pray for a 40-year-old congresswoman largely unknown outside Arizona until Loughner started shooting, pray for her the way they would a family member. And pray for the others who were injured and the heroes who prevented a greater loss of life, all these Americans joined together by the moment when the shooting started in Tucson.

And four were injured after a high school basketball game in Brooklyn on Friday night, but at least nobody died up the street from Bishop Loughlin.

“We saw a girl laid out, Corey Edwards, a Christ the King guard, said.

Then Edwards said, Coach could have been walking toward where they were shooting.”

Joe Arbitello didn’t know exactly where the shooting was, just knew that this time it was close to him, to a big win for his basketball team.

“How could you not think about Tucson?” Arbitello said. “I was wondering if this time some nut had opened fire near the team bus.”

Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/ny_local/2011/01/17/2011-01-17_the_bang_bang_bangs_getting_closer_bklyn_gunfire__and_coach_wonders_if_tucson_ca.html#ixzz1BJ9kbIvT






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