Jan 2, 2013
Coaches Abandoning Old School Motivational Tactics

NJ.com

http://www.nj.com/rutgersbasketball/index.ssf/2013/01/in_wake_of_mike_rices_suspensi.html

This past Saturday afternoon, most of the head coaches at the other 346 Division 1 basketball programs across the country went to work like they do every day. Whether it be in preparation for practice or a film session or a game, nearly every head coach in America was going about their business in typical fashion.

Not at Rutgers.

On Saturday, men’s basketball head coach Mike Rice returned to his team for the first time since Dec. 13, having served a 16-day suspension. The third-year coach had been banned from his program without pay, and also fined $50, 0, for a violation of athletic department policy — the result of an internal investigation that found a pattern of abusive behavior and language.

A contrite Rice returned to work this past weekend and will be on the sideline for Rutgers’ Big East opener at No. 7 Syracuse tonight, proclaiming it a second chance and that he knows he must change.

“It’s about what I do daily with practice and what I do daily with my team, Rice said Saturday. That’s truly what’s going to count.”

The disciplining of Rice is just the latest reminder that the days when players tolerated the verbal and sometimes physical prodding by head coaches are long gone.

“I’ll be honest, I know I’ve grabbed shirts a few times of players, former Connecticut coach Dom Perno said. It was just a reaction and many times, the kids just understand it. Yet, once you go beyond the boundaries of the kids, then it’s a different story. Once you step over that red line, so to speak, then you’re going to have a problem.”

Rice isn’t the only coach of late to find himself in the middle of a situation where a head coach crossed that boundary. Earlier this season, Morehead State head coach Sean Woods was suspended one game for shoving a player on the sidelines and berating him to the point of tears. In September, Texas Tech head coach Billy Gillispie resigned for health reasons while allegations of player abuse — including forcing injured players to practice — swirled around the Red Raiders’ program.

Coaches Abandoning Old School Motivational Tactics

NJ.com

http://www.nj.com/rutgersbasketball/index.ssf/2013/01/in_wake_of_mike_rices_suspensi.html

This past Saturday afternoon, most of the head coaches at the other 346 Division 1 basketball programs across the country went to work like they do every day. Whether it be in preparation for practice or a film session or a game, nearly every head coach in America was going about their business in typical fashion.

Not at Rutgers.

On Saturday, men’s basketball head coach Mike Rice returned to his team for the first time since Dec. 13, having served a 16-day suspension. The third-year coach had been banned from his program without pay, and also fined $50, 0, for a violation of athletic department policy — the result of an internal investigation that found a pattern of abusive behavior and language.

A contrite Rice returned to work this past weekend and will be on the sideline for Rutgers’ Big East opener at No. 7 Syracuse tonight, proclaiming it a second chance and that he knows he must change.

“It’s about what I do daily with practice and what I do daily with my team, Rice said Saturday. That’s truly what’s going to count.”

The disciplining of Rice is just the latest reminder that the days when players tolerated the verbal and sometimes physical prodding by head coaches are long gone.

“I’ll be honest, I know I’ve grabbed shirts a few times of players, former Connecticut coach Dom Perno said. It was just a reaction and many times, the kids just understand it. Yet, once you go beyond the boundaries of the kids, then it’s a different story. Once you step over that red line, so to speak, then you’re going to have a problem.”

Rice isn’t the only coach of late to find himself in the middle of a situation where a head coach crossed that boundary. Earlier this season, Morehead State head coach Sean Woods was suspended one game for shoving a player on the sidelines and berating him to the point of tears. In September, Texas Tech head coach Billy Gillispie resigned for health reasons while allegations of player abuse — including forcing injured players to practice — swirled around the Red Raiders’ program.






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