Nov 5, 2012
College Basketball Scoring Continues To Decline

TribLive

http://triblive.com/sports/college/ncaa/2866325-85/scoring-game-teams-basketball-coach-coaches-college-defense-points-shot#axzz2BMTizM9D

Connecticut coach Geno Auriemma stirred things up recently by suggesting that a lower rim in women’s college basketball might help create more offense. Many reacted with predictable scorn but a few other coaches thought it wasn’t a bad idea.

Now, what to do about the men?

Scoring in Division 1 men’s basketball reached historic lows in several categories last season, continuing a downward trend. Teams averaged the fewest points per game since 1982, before the shot clock became a fixture. Field goals attempted and made, possessions and even free throw attempts continued to decline.

The game has slowed down and become less interesting to those who understand the difference between tenacious defense and poor offensive execution. Reasons are varied, although it took Robert Morris coach Andy Toole about a millisecond to produce his own favorite.

“It’s a lack of skills, he said flatly. That’s exactly what it is, a lack of skills. It’s a changing culture from the fundamentals of the game.”

Said longtime ESPN analyst Dick Vitale, Kids are not shooting the ball as well from 15 feet and beyond. Most of them are trying to emulate the guy who can fly to the rim and dunk. Fundamentals have really deteriorated when it comes to shooting.

This explanation is not entirely new, and neither are past periods of offensive lulls. The scoring drought of ’82, for example, produced a chorus crying for a shot clock to prevent teams from hoarding the ball as a stall tactic or to wait out the perfect shot.

At the time, only the Sun Belt Conference used the shot clock. Scoring had stagnated. Besides teams milking the game clock, zone defenses, increasing conservatism among coaches and parity also were mentioned as factors.

“The very nature of a team sport has been subverted, as five-man efforts to make field goals has been replaced by one-man efforts to make foul shots, an article in Sports Illustrated complained.

, College Basketball Scoring Continues To Decline

TribLive

http://triblive.com/sports/college/ncaa/2866325-85/scoring-game-teams-basketball-coach-coaches-college-defense-points-shot#axzz2BMTizM9D

Connecticut coach Geno Auriemma stirred things up recently by suggesting that a lower rim in women’s college basketball might help create more offense. Many reacted with predictable scorn but a few other coaches thought it wasn’t a bad idea.

Now, what to do about the men?

Scoring in Division 1 men’s basketball reached historic lows in several categories last season, continuing a downward trend. Teams averaged the fewest points per game since 1982, before the shot clock became a fixture. Field goals attempted and made, possessions and even free throw attempts continued to decline.

The game has slowed down and become less interesting to those who understand the difference between tenacious defense and poor offensive execution. Reasons are varied, although it took Robert Morris coach Andy Toole about a millisecond to produce his own favorite.

It’s a lack of skills, he said flatly. That’s exactly what it is, a lack of skills. It’s a changing culture from the fundamentals of the game.”

Said longtime ESPN analyst Dick Vitale, Kids are not shooting the ball as well from 15 feet and beyond. Most of them are trying to emulate the guy who can fly to the rim and dunk. Fundamentals have really deteriorated when it comes to shooting.

This explanation is not entirely new, and neither are past periods of offensive lulls. The scoring drought of ’82, for example, produced a chorus crying for a shot clock to prevent teams from hoarding the ball as a stall tactic or to wait out the perfect shot.

At the time, only the Sun Belt Conference used the shot clock. Scoring had stagnated. Besides teams milking the game clock, zone defenses, increasing conservatism among coaches and parity also were mentioned as factors.

“The very nature of a team sport has been subverted, as five-man efforts to make field goals has been replaced by one-man efforts to make foul shots, ” an article in Sports Illustrated complained.






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