Mar 29, 2012
Committee To Choose U.S. Women’s Team

The Associated Press

http://www.washingtonpost.com/sports/us-womens-basketball-selection-committee-takes-pressure-off-coach-to-choose-team/2012/03/29/gIQA5sDIiS_story.html

One of the hardest tasks for any coach is cutting players.

It’s even more difficult when many of the players involved have helped you reach the pinnacle of your profession.

Fortunately for U.S. women’s national basketball coach Geno Auriemma, those decisions are made by a five-member selection committee. Sure the UConn coach gives a lot of input on whom he would like on the Olympic team, but the committee has the final say.

Its choices for the 2012 Olympic team will be unveiled Friday at the NCAA women’s Final Four in Denver.

“I think if the committee and the coach are working together it can be really good. There are some decisions that a coach is going to say ‘I really want this kid on the team, ‘” Auriemma said. “Others where the committee says, ‘For these particular picks we shouldn’t leave it up to you since you’re so close to the situation. We’ll take it out of your hands for you.’ When you have a lot of your former players involved you don’t want to be making that call.”

There’s a chance that half this Olympic team could be former Huskies since six of the 21 finalists graduated from UConn. The 2010 world championship team that won a gold medal in the Czech Republic featured all six: Sue Bird, Diana Taurasi, Maya Moore, Tina Charles, Swin Cash and Ashja Jones.

“This is a unique situation with several former UConn players in the mix here, USA Basketball executive director Jim Tooley said. Having the committee in place is to protect the coach. The coach has a voice but no vote.”

How unique is it? Since 1976, none of the Olympic coaches have had more than a few of their players on the squad.

“We heard a little about it in 2010, Tooley said. They are all deserving people in the mix, not because our national team coach is their former coach.”

Auriemma echoed Tooley’s sentiment.

“When you look at the players involved, some of them are the best to ever play the game, he said. Sue, Diana, Maya, Tina, if you leave them off, who are you going to put on instead? There are a lot of really good players who aren’t going to make the Olympic team. There’s nobody on the team that you’re going to say they shouldn’t be on it. It’s an impossible situation. “

Committee To Choose U.S. Women’s Team

The Associated Press

http://www.washingtonpost.com/sports/us-womens-basketball-selection-committee-takes-pressure-off-coach-to-choose-team/2012/03/29/gIQA5sDIiS_story.html

One of the hardest tasks for any coach is cutting players.

It’s even more difficult when many of the players involved have helped you reach the pinnacle of your profession.

Fortunately for U.S. women’s national basketball coach Geno Auriemma, those decisions are made by a five-member selection committee. Sure the UConn coach gives a lot of input on whom he would like on the Olympic team, but the committee has the final say.

Its choices for the 2012 Olympic team will be unveiled Friday at the NCAA women’s Final Four in Denver.

“I think if the committee and the coach are working together it can be really good. There are some decisions that a coach is going to say ‘I really want this kid on the team, ‘” Auriemma said. “Others where the committee says, ‘For these particular picks we shouldn’t leave it up to you since you’re so close to the situation. We’ll take it out of your hands for you.’ When you have a lot of your former players involved you don’t want to be making that call.”

There’s a chance that half this Olympic team could be former Huskies since six of the 21 finalists graduated from UConn. The 2010 world championship team that won a gold medal in the Czech Republic featured all six: Sue Bird, Diana Taurasi, Maya Moore, Tina Charles, Swin Cash and Ashja Jones.

“This is a unique situation with several former UConn players in the mix here, USA Basketball executive director Jim Tooley said. Having the committee in place is to protect the coach. The coach has a voice but no vote.”

How unique is it? Since 1976, none of the Olympic coaches have had more than a few of their players on the squad.

“We heard a little about it in 2010, Tooley said. They are all deserving people in the mix, not because our national team coach is their former coach.”

Auriemma echoed Tooley’s sentiment.

“When you look at the players involved, some of them are the best to ever play the game, he said. Sue, Diana, Maya, Tina, if you leave them off, who are you going to put on instead? There are a lot of really good players who aren’t going to make the Olympic team. There’s nobody on the team that you’re going to say they shouldn’t be on it. It’s an impossible situation. “






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