Mar 6, 2012
Oversight Forces High School Teams To Shoot From NCAA 3-Point Line

New York Daily News, Mitch Abramson

http://www.nydailynews.com/sports/high-school/psal-boys-shoot-ncaa-regulation-3-point-arc-st-john-league-neglects-check-dimensions-article-1.1033641

The first thing Curtis boys basketball coach Richie Buckheit realized when he took the court at St. John’s Carnesecca Arena on Sunday was the 3-point line.

It was too far away from the hoop — 20 feet, nine inches, to be exact — for his team’s PSAL “AA” quarterfinals game against Lincoln.

“Those are college dimensions, Buckheit said he thought to himself.

The PSAL has been playing with high school measurements, 19 feet, nine inches, for the whole season. Why change now?

You shoot your 3s from a certain spot all season, Buckheit said. You run your sets from a certain place on the floor, and then for the biggest game of the year it’s different?”

Acknowledging its mistake on Monday, the PSAL vowed to reign in the 3-point arc to 19 feet, 9 inches — the measurements stipulated in the National Federation of State High School Associations rules — for Saturday’s PSAL Class AA semifinals at St. John’s.

Third-seeded Lincoln will take on No. 2 Boys & Girls, and top-seeded Jefferson will play No. 4 Wings.

The line on the Carnesecca Arena hardwood will be corrected in time for the CHSAA Class AA boys Intersectional semifinals, scheduled for Wednesday, in which N.Y. 1 seed St. Raymond will play N.Y. 3 Cardinal Hayes and N.Y. 2 Mount St. Michael will go up against Holy Cross, the top seed out of Brooklyn/Queens.

Buckheit said he was happy the line will be adjusted for those teams, but he noted that the schools that had to play with a college-distance 3-point line on Sunday, including his own, were done a disservice.

Curtis, the sixth seed in the 23-team PSAL field, made just four 3-pointers in a 50-47 loss to Lincoln in the PSAL Class AA quarterfinals.

“I’d rather have played the game at Lincoln if I had known I was going to be playing using a college 3-point line, said Buckheit, whose team relied on outside shooting to combat Lincoln’s size advantage on the inside. I know the 3-point line was the same for both teams, but you had one team that was using it as a weapon to deal with another team’s greater size, he added. It’s still a major mistake that was made.”

The Department of Education chalked up the slip-up to an oversight on the part of St. John’s.

“The PSAL was never told beforehand that the (high school) line was removed, Department of Education spokeswoman Margie Feinberg told the Daily News, adding that the high school dimensions were used in both the quarterfinals and semifinals last season, and also in the PSAL championship games at Madison Square Garden.

L.H. Holmgren, the assistant athletic director for facilities and operations at St. John’s, declined to comment, saying only: The PSAL is our client and we rent the facility to them.”

Jefferson coach Lawrence Pollard called it an “embarrassing” blunder on the part of the PSAL to have used college shooting standards on Saturday during the quarterfinals.

“They should have been more prepared, Pollard said of the PSAL. If we’re not prepared, they always want to send us a letter about what we’re doing wrong. It doesn’t matter. I’m going to find a way to win anyway.”

Cardozo coach Ron Naclerio was similarly irked over having to play with a college 3-point line and wondered whether the outcome of his Judges’ quarterfinals loss to Wings would have been different.

The Judges, a freewheeling team, rely heavily on the 3-point shot but went a combined 0-10 from beyond the arc in the first and third quarters of a 54-46 loss to Wings.

“Most high school players who are good 3-point shooters struggle a bit when they make it to college, Naclerio said. You could see we were off a little on those shots. If it was closer, maybe we would have hit more.”

Lincoln coach Dwayne (Tiny) Morton labeled the gaffe as a “mistake, but he said the distance of the 3-point line should be kept the same, since teams already played with the NCAA distances in the quarterfinals.

It should have been moved in from the beginning, Morton said. But I don’t think they should change anything in the course of the season now. If it wasn’t done for the teams (Sunday), then it doesn’t make sense to do it for the teams in the semifinals. Why do it now?”

Oversight Forces High School Teams To Shoot From NCAA 3-Point Line

New York Daily News, Mitch Abramson

http://www.nydailynews.com/sports/high-school/psal-boys-shoot-ncaa-regulation-3-point-arc-st-john-league-neglects-check-dimensions-article-1.1033641

The first thing Curtis boys basketball coach Richie Buckheit realized when he took the court at St. John’s Carnesecca Arena on Sunday was the 3-point line.

It was too far away from the hoop — 20 feet, nine inches, to be exact — for his team’s PSAL “AA” quarterfinals game against Lincoln.

“Those are college dimensions, Buckheit said he thought to himself.

The PSAL has been playing with high school measurements, 19 feet, nine inches, for the whole season. Why change now?

You shoot your 3s from a certain spot all season, Buckheit said. You run your sets from a certain place on the floor, and then for the biggest game of the year it’s different?”

Acknowledging its mistake on Monday, the PSAL vowed to reign in the 3-point arc to 19 feet, 9 inches — the measurements stipulated in the National Federation of State High School Associations rules — for Saturday’s PSAL Class AA semifinals at St. John’s.

Third-seeded Lincoln will take on No. 2 Boys & Girls, and top-seeded Jefferson will play No. 4 Wings.

The line on the Carnesecca Arena hardwood will be corrected in time for the CHSAA Class AA boys Intersectional semifinals, scheduled for Wednesday, in which N.Y. 1 seed St. Raymond will play N.Y. 3 Cardinal Hayes and N.Y. 2 Mount St. Michael will go up against Holy Cross, the top seed out of Brooklyn/Queens.

Buckheit said he was happy the line will be adjusted for those teams, but he noted that the schools that had to play with a college-distance 3-point line on Sunday, including his own, were done a disservice.

Curtis, the sixth seed in the 23-team PSAL field, made just four 3-pointers in a 50-47 loss to Lincoln in the PSAL Class AA quarterfinals.

“I’d rather have played the game at Lincoln if I had known I was going to be playing using a college 3-point line, said Buckheit, whose team relied on outside shooting to combat Lincoln’s size advantage on the inside. I know the 3-point line was the same for both teams, but you had one team that was using it as a weapon to deal with another team’s greater size, he added. It’s still a major mistake that was made.”

The Department of Education chalked up the slip-up to an oversight on the part of St. John’s.

“The PSAL was never told beforehand that the (high school) line was removed, Department of Education spokeswoman Margie Feinberg told the Daily News, adding that the high school dimensions were used in both the quarterfinals and semifinals last season, and also in the PSAL championship games at Madison Square Garden.

L.H. Holmgren, the assistant athletic director for facilities and operations at St. John’s, declined to comment, saying only: The PSAL is our client and we rent the facility to them.”

Jefferson coach Lawrence Pollard called it an “embarrassing” blunder on the part of the PSAL to have used college shooting standards on Saturday during the quarterfinals.

“They should have been more prepared, Pollard said of the PSAL. If we’re not prepared, they always want to send us a letter about what we’re doing wrong. It doesn’t matter. I’m going to find a way to win anyway.”

Cardozo coach Ron Naclerio was similarly irked over having to play with a college 3-point line and wondered whether the outcome of his Judges’ quarterfinals loss to Wings would have been different.

The Judges, a freewheeling team, rely heavily on the 3-point shot but went a combined 0-10 from beyond the arc in the first and third quarters of a 54-46 loss to Wings.

“Most high school players who are good 3-point shooters struggle a bit when they make it to college, Naclerio said. You could see we were off a little on those shots. If it was closer, maybe we would have hit more.”

Lincoln coach Dwayne (Tiny) Morton labeled the gaffe as a “mistake, but he said the distance of the 3-point line should be kept the same, since teams already played with the NCAA distances in the quarterfinals.

It should have been moved in from the beginning, Morton said. But I don’t think they should change anything in the course of the season now. If it wasn’t done for the teams (Sunday), then it doesn’t make sense to do it for the teams in the semifinals. Why do it now?”






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