Sep 18, 2012
Social Media Presents Challenges For Coaches

The Ledger

http://www.theledger.com/article/20120917/NEWS/120919304/1254?Title=Social-Media-Challenges-Colleges-

When an angry Webber International University tennis player began posting his displeasure on Facebook with “demeaning” posts about the program, Athletic Director Bill Heath acted quickly.

“He had one hour to get it off or I was pulling his scholarship, Heath said. I met with him the next day and explained to him how I felt about that. He’s getting scholarship money to be here and he’s not allowed to go on any social media or discredit the program or the university or any of his teammates. He did the right thing.”

Social media is a double-edged sword for college athletic programs. The internet can be a boon for recruiting but can also lead to embarrassment for coaches, athletic directors and even athletes.

Basketball players at the University of Kentucky have been banned from using specific words on Facebook and Twitter.

Florida State football coach Jimbo Fisher has banned his players from Twitter the past two years. His reason: They’re not mature enough to address direct criticism from fans on a large scale.

“Today’s world is much different, Heath said.

Coaches at local colleges have addressed social media in different ways.

For instance, Webber women’s volleyball coach Brian Goodhind has his players hand in their cell phones at curfew if they are on the road for a contest. And many admit that they’ve dropped interest in a recruit because of something the recruit posted on Facebook or Twitter.

Social Media Presents Challenges For Coaches

The Ledger

http://www.theledger.com/article/20120917/NEWS/120919304/1254?Title=Social-Media-Challenges-Colleges-

When an angry Webber International University tennis player began posting his displeasure on Facebook with “demeaning” posts about the program, Athletic Director Bill Heath acted quickly.

“He had one hour to get it off or I was pulling his scholarship, Heath said. I met with him the next day and explained to him how I felt about that. He’s getting scholarship money to be here and he’s not allowed to go on any social media or discredit the program or the university or any of his teammates. He did the right thing.”

Social media is a double-edged sword for college athletic programs. The internet can be a boon for recruiting but can also lead to embarrassment for coaches, athletic directors and even athletes.

Basketball players at the University of Kentucky have been banned from using specific words on Facebook and Twitter.

Florida State football coach Jimbo Fisher has banned his players from Twitter the past two years. His reason: They’re not mature enough to address direct criticism from fans on a large scale.

“Today’s world is much different, ” Heath said.

Coaches at local colleges have addressed social media in different ways.

For instance, Webber women’s volleyball coach Brian Goodhind has his players hand in their cell phones at curfew if they are on the road for a contest. And many admit that they’ve dropped interest in a recruit because of something the recruit posted on Facebook or Twitter.






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