Apr 13, 2012
Tippy Dye Passes Away At 97

The Seattle Times, Percy Allen

http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/huskybasketball/2017969485_dyeobit13.html

Tippy Dye, the diminutive Midwesterner with the distinctive first name, left a legacy at Ohio State, Washington and Nebraska as a standout athlete, coach and administrator during a decorated career that spanned four decades.

The former Washington men’s basketball coach guided the Huskies to their only NCAA tournament semifinal appearance in 1953.

On Wednesday afternoon, he died at Spring Hill Manor in Grass Valley, Calif., at the age of 97.

“It was very peaceful, said his daughter Penny Carnegie.

It’s impossible to write the history of UW basketball without devoting a chapter to Dye, the school’s 10th coach, who took the program to unprecedented levels on and off the court.

He arrived in 1951 and took a job that paid $12,500.

He came at the start of our sophomore year, said former UW star Bob Houbregs. From the first moment we met him you knew he was in charge. He came in and it was our first glance at him. And he was 5-6. Boy, it’s a good thing everyone was sitting down because we could see who he was.

“But he took command right away. He let us know what to expect. Told us to dress properly and that we’d play hard defense. He just went on and on. That was the first meeting, and in short order, we had success.”

In Dye’s first season, he led Washington to the NCAA tournament and a 24-6 record. The next year the Huskies were 25-6.

During the 1952-53 season, Dye guided the Huskies to a 28-3 record. Washington was the favorite to win the national title but lost 79-53 to Kansas in the semifinals. The Huskies then beat Louisiana State 88-69 to finish third.

The win was the culmination of a wildly successful three-year start at UW and the pinnacle of Dye’s coaching career.

Six years later, he left Washington with a 156-91 record. Dye ranks fourth on Washington’s all-time win list behind Hec Edmundson (488-195), Marv Harshman (246-146) and Lorenzo Romar (219-113).

“He left an unbelievable legacy with this program, but more so with his players, Romar said in a 2010 interview. Talking to his players and those that watched the program, they might say: ‘Tippy would never let that fly, ‘ or ‘Tippy would do it this way.’

Tippy Dye Passes Away At 97

The Seattle Times, Percy Allen

http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/huskybasketball/2017969485_dyeobit13.html

Tippy Dye, the diminutive Midwesterner with the distinctive first name, left a legacy at Ohio State, Washington and Nebraska as a standout athlete, coach and administrator during a decorated career that spanned four decades.

The former Washington men’s basketball coach guided the Huskies to their only NCAA tournament semifinal appearance in 1953.

On Wednesday afternoon, he died at Spring Hill Manor in Grass Valley, Calif., at the age of 97.

“It was very peaceful, said his daughter Penny Carnegie.

It’s impossible to write the history of UW basketball without devoting a chapter to Dye, the school’s 10th coach, who took the program to unprecedented levels on and off the court.

He arrived in 1951 and took a job that paid $12,500.

He came at the start of our sophomore year, said former UW star Bob Houbregs. From the first moment we met him you knew he was in charge. He came in and it was our first glance at him. And he was 5-6. Boy, it’s a good thing everyone was sitting down because we could see who he was.

“But he took command right away. He let us know what to expect. Told us to dress properly and that we’d play hard defense. He just went on and on. That was the first meeting, and in short order, we had success.”

In Dye’s first season, he led Washington to the NCAA tournament and a 24-6 record. The next year the Huskies were 25-6.

During the 1952-53 season, Dye guided the Huskies to a 28-3 record. Washington was the favorite to win the national title but lost 79-53 to Kansas in the semifinals. The Huskies then beat Louisiana State 88-69 to finish third.

The win was the culmination of a wildly successful three-year start at UW and the pinnacle of Dye’s coaching career.

Six years later, he left Washington with a 156-91 record. Dye ranks fourth on Washington’s all-time win list behind Hec Edmundson (488-195), Marv Harshman (246-146) and Lorenzo Romar (219-113).

“He left an unbelievable legacy with this program, but more so with his players, Romar said in a 2010 interview. Talking to his players and those that watched the program, they might say: ‘Tippy would never let that fly, ‘ or ‘Tippy would do it this way.’






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