Jan 6, 2012
University Honoring Coach For 30 Years On Bench

Sioux City Journal, Michael Brauer

http://www.siouxcityjournal.com/sports/basketball/college/briar_cliff/schultz-spending-th-season-on-briar-cliff-s-bench/article_f5b0e812-cebd-526f-bc48-0df361511c41.html

SIOUX CITY — Ask Ron Schultz about the time he scored the first points in Briar Cliff basketball history.

He can describe every detail from that 1967 game. He’ll even show you the tape.

“My kids have all seen it, and I thought they were looking at it because they wanted to see me play, said the 64-year-old Schultz. But they just wanted to laugh at the short shorts and the Converse tennis shoes.”

The Briar Cliff shorts are saggier these days, and the sneakers shinier.

But Schultz’s commitment to BC basketball hasn’t changed one bit.

Briar Cliff will honor the assistant coach’s 30th year of sideline service on Saturday, prior to the Chargers’ CNOS Foundation Classic matchup against city rival Morningside.

Schultz is already a 1992 inductee to the Charger Athletic Hall of Fame.

“Quite frankly, when you talk about Briar Cliff basketball there are two names that come up, former head coach Todd Barry said. The first one is Ray Nacke. And the second one is Ron Schultz.”

No surprise there.

After all, Schultz was the legendary Coach Nacke’s right-hand man for 22 seasons from 1973 to 1995. Before he played at Briar Cliff, Schultz starred for Nacke on Bishop Heelan high school’s first-ever state tournament team in 1966.

“He was a heck of an athlete, Nacke recalled.

Schultz had a habit of making hometown history on the hardwood — including the first 2″ to ever be penciled in the Briar Cliff scorebook.

Geared up in those aforementioned Converse sneakers and his No. 12 jersey (which has since been retired), Schultz broke loose on a split-post play with teammate Jim Hinrich and took the historic shot.

“I’m really glad that shot went in, Schultz said. I caught it and was open, shot it and fortunately it went in. And then we played on.”

Schultz, especially. He’d score 1, 351 more points over his collegiate career — a BC record at the time.

Inspired by Nacke, Schultz then went into coaching himself. Then, two years after taking over Briar Cliff’s program, Nacke hired his former pupil.

Turned out they were the perfect match.

The fiery Nacke stomped the sidelines and Schultz provided the even-keel presence to balance him out.

“I guess I got after the guys, sometimes, Nacke said with a chuckle. Ron would kind of come in and soothe things a little bit there. So I think we had a really good mix.”

“Ray was a pretty competitive guy and he coached hard, Schultz added. My role was to be an extra set of eyes, make suggestions — and if somebody needed a pat on the back, go do that kind of thing.”

The combo coached the Chargers to 11 national tournament appearances until Schultz left in 1995, two years before Nacke retired.

Schultz planned on “taking a break” from coaching and wanted to watch one of his five kids, Kevin, play on Heelan’s sophomore squad.

But the move from the sidelines to the stands didn’t last long.

“We only had one sophomore coach, and it’s hard to coach a team by yourself, Schultz said.

He was asked to volunteer, and the coaching bug bit again.

Eight seasons later — four with the sophomore boys and four as Heelan’s head girls coach — Schultz was approached by Todd Barry, who had just arrived across town at Briar Cliff.

To resurrect BC’s basketball program, Barry knew he needed one man, in particular.

Schultz didn’t need much convincing.

Said Barry: I felt like I brought in several really good recruits. But I think one of my best recruiting jobs was bringing Ron Schultz back to the program.”

When Barry retired after last season, four-year assistant Nic Nelson took charge of the program. It was a no-brainer for Nelson to ask Schultz to stay.

“The guys in the program have so much respect for him because of what he did here as a player and the coaching career he’s had here, Nelson said.

Schultz is a Sioux City lifer who spent 16 years as an elementary P.E. teacher and 21 more as a counselor in the Sioux City public school system, before taking his current counseling position at Heelan.

He’s coached the entire time — everything from freshman football to girls basketball.

Well, just about everything.

I’ve never coached wrestling, he quipped.

Not that he couldn’t. He’s just in too high of demand for coaching hoops.

Guys like him don’t come around too often, Nelson said. I would love to have him go 30 more years doing this.”

Briar Cliff Honoring Coach After 30 Years

Sioux City Journal, Michael Brauer

http://www.siouxcityjournal.com/sports/basketball/college/briar_cliff/schultz-spending-th-season-on-briar-cliff-s-bench/article_f5b0e812-cebd-526f-bc48-0df361511c41.html

SIOUX CITY — Ask Ron Schultz about the time he scored the first points in Briar Cliff basketball history.

He can describe every detail from that 1967 game. He’ll even show you the tape.

“My kids have all seen it, and I thought they were looking at it because they wanted to see me play, said the 64-year-old Schultz. But they just wanted to laugh at the short shorts and the Converse tennis shoes.”

The Briar Cliff shorts are saggier these days, and the sneakers shinier.

But Schultz’s commitment to BC basketball hasn’t changed one bit.

Briar Cliff will honor the assistant coach’s 30th year of sideline service on Saturday, prior to the Chargers’ CNOS Foundation Classic matchup against city rival Morningside.

Schultz is already a 1992 inductee to the Charger Athletic Hall of Fame.

“Quite frankly, when you talk about Briar Cliff basketball there are two names that come up, former head coach Todd Barry said. The first one is Ray Nacke. And the second one is Ron Schultz.”

No surprise there.

After all, Schultz was the legendary Coach Nacke’s right-hand man for 22 seasons from 1973 to 1995. Before he played at Briar Cliff, Schultz starred for Nacke on Bishop Heelan high school’s first-ever state tournament team in 1966.

“He was a heck of an athlete, Nacke recalled.

Schultz had a habit of making hometown history on the hardwood — including the first 2″ to ever be penciled in the Briar Cliff scorebook.

Geared up in those aforementioned Converse sneakers and his No. 12 jersey (which has since been retired), Schultz broke loose on a split-post play with teammate Jim Hinrich and took the historic shot.

“I’m really glad that shot went in, Schultz said. I caught it and was open, shot it and fortunately it went in. And then we played on.”

Schultz, especially. He’d score 1, 351 more points over his collegiate career — a BC record at the time.

Inspired by Nacke, Schultz then went into coaching himself. Then, two years after taking over Briar Cliff’s program, Nacke hired his former pupil.

Turned out they were the perfect match.

The fiery Nacke stomped the sidelines and Schultz provided the even-keel presence to balance him out.

“I guess I got after the guys, sometimes, Nacke said with a chuckle. Ron would kind of come in and soothe things a little bit there. So I think we had a really good mix.”

“Ray was a pretty competitive guy and he coached hard, Schultz added. My role was to be an extra set of eyes, make suggestions — and if somebody needed a pat on the back, go do that kind of thing.”

The combo coached the Chargers to 11 national tournament appearances until Schultz left in 1995, two years before Nacke retired.

Schultz planned on “taking a break” from coaching and wanted to watch one of his five kids, Kevin, play on Heelan’s sophomore squad.

But the move from the sidelines to the stands didn’t last long.

“We only had one sophomore coach, and it’s hard to coach a team by yourself, Schultz said.

He was asked to volunteer, and the coaching bug bit again.

Eight seasons later — four with the sophomore boys and four as Heelan’s head girls coach — Schultz was approached by Todd Barry, who had just arrived across town at Briar Cliff.

To resurrect BC’s basketball program, Barry knew he needed one man, in particular.

Schultz didn’t need much convincing.

Said Barry: I felt like I brought in several really good recruits. But I think one of my best recruiting jobs was bringing Ron Schultz back to the program.”

When Barry retired after last season, four-year assistant Nic Nelson took charge of the program. It was a no-brainer for Nelson to ask Schultz to stay.

“The guys in the program have so much respect for him because of what he did here as a player and the coaching career he’s had here, Nelson said.

Schultz is a Sioux City lifer who spent 16 years as an elementary P.E. teacher and 21 more as a counselor in the Sioux City public school system, before taking his current counseling position at Heelan.

He’s coached the entire time — everything from freshman football to girls basketball.

Well, just about everything.

I’ve never coached wrestling, he quipped.

Not that he couldn’t. He’s just in too high of demand for coaching hoops.

Guys like him don’t come around too often, Nelson said. I would love to have him go 30 more years doing this.”






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